“Divine Soil”

Although we already studied about how civilizations couldn’t exist without soil I found this really interesting article on how Greeks veiwed soil. Everyone knows Greeks had gods and goddesses they worshiped but new evidence has come out that shows that Greeks even viewed soil as “divine”. Their temples were chosen very tediously because the soil the buildings were built on had to be considered “holy”. It’s funny because you could almost infer that they the soil they saw as “divine” was infact soil that could only support temples and shrines. We all know sand isn’t good to build structures on. Also, the gods’ and goddesses’ temples were built on soil “related” to what god or goddess they were. For example, Hermes, the god of oxen, had his temple built on clay-rich soil-which would have been idle for oxen and cattle to graze upon. Interesting how sometimes we see people as uncivilized but really they are even more advanced that us.

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2 Responses to “Divine Soil”

  1. alexmckinzie says:

    Nice post Amy. I really think this is kind of ironic how the greeks thought of how our soil is “divine” and yet humans have completely threw that ourt the window. Today we have been so abusive to our soil I think of it as far from holy as possible.

  2. Yeah, I’d like to look into some of the polytheistic religions and how many of them recongized the soil as holy or if there was a diety to symbolize the soil.
    Many cultures may have plausibly even considered it an element, as many considered water or fire to be elements.

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